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Here’s a look back at some the biggest stories we covered this week, including news about Bill Cosby, Halsey and Abba, as well as tributes to Avicii and Verne Troyer.

Excitement greeted the news that pop legends Abba have returned to the studio to record their first new music since the 1980s.

The Swedish quartet said the new material was an “unexpected consequence” of their recent decision to put together a “virtual reality” tour.

No release date has been set for the new songs – but one of them, titled I Still Have Faith In You, will be performed in December on a TV special broadcast by the BBC and NBC.


Joanna Lumley spoke about how she is “terrified that all men are seen as bad” in the wake of the Hollywood sex scandal.

The actress told Good Housekeeping magazine: “This year I do feel the spirit of the suffragettes is with us and we’re speaking out about women being treated badly around the world.”

But the The Ab Fab star added: “We mustn’t deride all men, as only the few are bad and we need to remember that, too.”


Film fans mourned Verne Troyer, who is best known for playing Mini-Me in the Austin Powers movies.

The actor, who was 2ft 8in (81cm) tall, had previously battled alcohol addiction and was admitted to hospital in Los Angeles earlier this month for unspecified reasons. He was 49.

British film star Warwick Davis – also of restricted growth – paid testament to the pair’s “mutual respect” and praised Troyer’s “good humour” in the face of adversity.


US comedian Bill Cosby was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault, each of which carries a potential 10 years in prison.

The actor, 80, who made his name on The Cosby Show, had been on trial for drugging and assaulting ex-basketball player Andrea Constand in 2004.

Cosby, the first major black actor on primetime TV, will remain out of jail until he is sentenced, the judge ruled.


Actor Hank Azaria revealed he is “willing to step aside” from his role voicing Simpsons character Apu Nahasapeemapetilon.

It follows a documentary made by Indian-American comic Hari Kondabolu, which argued the Indian character is based on racial stereotypes.

Speaking on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, the actor said his “eyes have been opened” by the debate and that he never intended to cause offence.


US singer Halsey spoke out about the moment she realised she was having a miscarriage during a concert.

“I was on tour, and I found out I was pregnant,” Halsey told The Doctors, in a segment on endometriosis, a condition she revealed she has in 2016.

“The next thing I knew I was on stage miscarrying in the middle of my concert.”


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